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Topics - steed

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1
How-2? / How2 - Replace shock absorbers and fit lowering springs.
« on: May 27, 2015, 12:36:12 pm »
So I managed to find this in amongst my old threads and thought that it really should be on here. This is the results of dropping my paseo on teins and a basic step by step guide to fitting lowering springs. Firstly you'll need some of these:

 

 and one of these: (other vehicles are available)

 

 You may also need some tools, here's a rough list of the ones I used: metric sockets: 10mm, 12mm, 14mm, 19mm socket ratchet adjustable spanner breaker bar (I used 24" 1/2 size one after breaking two 12" 3/8) hammer metric spanners: 14mm, 19mm axle stands spring compressors jack WD-40 (or other penetrating fluid) you'll need lots. I started with the front (because if you only manage to do one half of the car a low front doesn't look as bad as a high front). jack the car up, hand brake on firmly, and remove the wheel (I recommend loosening the wheel nuts while the car is on the floor). WD-40 the lower strut bolts and any bolts attaching brake hoses or drop links to the strut.

 

 Important: remove brake hoses first, ensuring the stay clear and don't present a snagging hazard later on (they are very important). Whilst the strut is still bolted the on loosen the top mount bolts but don't completely undo them.

 

 Now you can undo the lower strut bolts (they will be very hard to free so use lots of WD-40 and the large breaker bar). Once removed roll the hub forward to allow the strut to come away more easily.

 

 Now you can remove the top mount bolts and lower the whole spring and strut assembly out of the turret. Pictured here with spring compressor attached.



 I recommend loosening shock absorber top nut at this point. Tighten the spring compressors until there is slight play in the spring between the top mount and the lower dish of the strut. Now fully undo the shock absorber top nut and remove the top mount.



 With the top mount removed take off the top strut dish followed by the spring, the rubber/plastic boot will probably come off with it, this isnít a problem.



 Clean the gunk that has built up at the top on the shock and marvel at the difference between you old rusty shock and the shiny new one.



 Remove the spring compressor and fit the to the new spring, I put a rag down whilst tighten the compressor to avoid damaging the Teins too much. When you have tighten them sufficiently youíll be able to slide the spring on followed by the rubber/plastic boot, then the strut top dish finally followed by the top mount. If you have tighten the spring enough youíll but able to do up the shock top nut with any too much difficulty, do not tighten the shock top nut completely.



 Before releasing the spring compressors line up the springs with the indentís in the top and bottom strut dishes.



 Now you can remove the springs compressors and put the strut and spring assembly back in, being careful to ensure the top mount goes in the correct way round. Itís easy to rotate providing you left the shock top nut loose.



 Tighten the top mount bolts then refit the hub to the base of the strut. It is advisable to clean the bolts and nuts if you are re-using the old one as there may be damage to the threads otherwise. Donít forget to re-attach any drop links or brake hoses you may have removed.
 Now repeat for the other side. Next is the rear suspension, this can differ greatly from car to car, in this instance (the paseo) me have trailing arms with a panhard rod and spring over shock arrangement (this is exactly the same as the starlet).



 Remove the interior trim as necessary to access the rear strut top mounts.



 Loosen the top mount nuts whilst itís still fitted and WD-40 the shock top nut



 Now WD-40 the lower shock bolt and remove it, using the hammer gently tap out the strut and spring assembly (donít get to aggressive as it may damaged the shock).



 Now fully undo the top mount bolts and remove the strut spring assembly.



 Spring compressors on again and squash the spring until there is play between the top and bottom strut dishes. Using the adjustable spanner and a regular spanner (or another adjustable) undo and remove the shock top nut.



 Remove washer, top mount and rubber/plastic boot along with the spring, then compare.



 This is the rear strut assembly broken down into its components.



 Using the spring compressors squash the new spring until you can fit the rubber/plastic boot, top mount, washer and nut. Not forgetting to position the spring correctly in the lower dish (the top is not so important on this rear strut, others may require correct positioning though). Do not fully tighten the shock top nut just yet, refit the strut and spring assembly.



 With the strut back in bolt the bottom onto the trailing arms, I recommend using a spanner or similar the lever the bottom of the strut into position. Tighten the top mount bolts and now fully tighten the strut top bolt.



 Now repeat on the other side. Once finished lower return you car to the road, have a cup of tea/beer/something stronger. Oh and enjoy you lowered ride!

 

2
Technical & Maintenance / Toyota EL54 Paseo '97 Quick Reference Card
« on: February 04, 2014, 10:11:43 pm »
Well i won this on eBay some  time in 2012 for very little, simply because it was Paseo related and cool (also i had not seen one before). I thought I'd share it with you all as it may well be useful to you as it was to me:





 8) Enjoy!

3
Please note that the car featured here *sniff, sniff* is no longer with us due to excessive tin worm.  :'(

Right so this is a two fold thread: the results of dropping my paseo on tein springs and a basic step by step guide to fitting lowering springs. Firstly you'll need some of these:

 
 
and one of these: (other vehicles are available)


 
You may also need some tools, here's a rough list of the ones I used:

 - metric sockets: 10mm, 12mm, 14mm, 19mm
 - socket ratchet
 - adjustable spanner
 - breaker bar (i used 24" 1/2 size one after breaking two 12" 3/8)
 - hammer
 - metric spanners: 14mm, 19mm
 - axle stands
 - spring compressors
 - jack
 - WD-40 (or other penetrating fluid) you'll need lots.

I started with the front (because if you only manage to do one half of the car a low front doesn't look as bad as a high front). jack the car up, hand brake on firmly, and remove the wheel (i recommend loosening the wheel nuts while the car is on the floor). WD-40 the lower strut bolts ans any bolts attaching brake hoses or drop links to the strut.



Important: remove brake hoses first, ensuring the stay clear and don't present a snagging hazard later on (they are very important). Whilst the strut is still bolted the on loosen the top mount bolts but don't completely undo them.



Now you can undo the lower strut bolts (they will be very hard to free so use lots of WD-40 and the large breaker bar). Once removed roll the hub forward to allow the strut to come away more easily.



Now you can remove the top mount bolts and lower the whole spring and strut assembly out of the turret. Pictured here with spring compressor attached.



 I recommend loosening shock absorber top nut at this point. Tighten the spring compressors until there is slight play in the spring between the top mount and the lower dish of the strut. Now fully undo the shock absorber top nut and remove the top mount.



With the top mount removed take off the top strut dish followed by the spring, the rubber/plastic boot will probably come off with it, this isnít a problem.



Clean the gunk that has built up at the top on the shock and marvel at the difference between you old rusty shock and the shiny new one.



Remove the spring compressor and fit the to the new spring, I put a rag down whilst tighten the compressor to avoid damaging the Teins too much. When you have tighten them sufficiently youíll be able to slide the spring on followed by the rubber/plastic boot, then the strut top dish finally followed by the top mount. If you have tighten the spring enough youíll but able to do up the shock top nut with any too much difficulty, do not tighten the shock top nut completely.



Before releasing the spring compressors line up the springs with the indentís in the top and bottom strut dishes.



Now you can remove the springs compressors and put the strut and spring assembly back in, being careful to ensure the top mount goes in the correct way round. Itís easy to rotate providing you left the shock top nut loose.



Tighten the top mount bolts then refit the hub to the base of the strut. It is advisable to clean the bolts and nuts if you are re-using the old one as there may be damage to the threads otherwise. Donít forget to re-attach any drop links or brake hoses you may have removed.
Now repeat for the other side. Next is the rear suspension, this can differ greatly from car to car, in this instance (the paseo) me have trailing arms with a panhard rod and spring over shock arrangement (this is exactly the same as the starlet).



Remove the interior trim as necessary to access the rear strut top mounts.



Loosen the top mount nuts whilst itís still fitted and WD-40 the shock top nut



Now WD-40 the lower shock bolt and remove it, using the hammer gently tap out the strut and spring assembly (donít get to aggressive as it may damaged the shock).



Now fully undo the top mount bolts and remove the strut spring assembly.



Spring compressors on again and squash the spring until there is play between the top and bottom strut dishes. Using the adjustable spanner and a regular spanner (or another adjustable) undo and remove the shock top nut.



Remove washer, top mount and rubber/plastic boot along with the spring, then compare.



This is the rear strut assembly broken down into its components.



Using the spring compressors squash the new spring until you can fit the rubber/plastic boot, top mount, washer and nut. Not forgetting to position the spring correctly in the lower dish (the top is not so important on this rear strut, others may require correct positioning though). Do not fully tighten the shock top nut just yet, refit the strut and spring assembly.



With the strut back in bolt the bottom onto the trailing arms, I recommend using a spanner or similar the lever the bottom of the strut into position. Tighten the top mount bolts and now fully tighten the strut top bolt.



Now repeat on the other side. Once finished lower return you car to the road, have a cup of tea/beer/something stronger. Oh and enjoy you lowered ride!

Generic Blurb bit for back-covering purposes:
Neither the author, nor the UK Paseo Club, assume any responsibility whatsoever for any work you conduct or is conducted in accordance with this guidance, or exerts pertaining to this guidance/information, as such anything you break is solely your problem (we werenít twisting your arm now were we!)

4
How-2? / How2 - Double Rear Side Light/Tail Light Mod Guide
« on: February 04, 2014, 11:48:17 am »
So, after having successfully completed this modification on Pedz’s car I thought it might benefit from a full write up so other members can do it themselves if they wish.
It’s very simple and if you aren’t afraid of a soldering iron then it’ll be easy too!
N.B. This theoretically could be done by twisting the wires or crimping them, however I would strongly advise against these two methods as they should only be used for temporary repairs/fitments as they can work loose or exposed wiring can corrode (wiring covered in electrical tape is still exposed and will corrode eventually). For these reasons I only recommend using a soldering iron and heat shrink, self-amalgamating tape is an acceptable alternative to heat shrink if applied properly.
Now that’s out of the way let’s get on with it. This neat little modification will give you an extra pair of side/tail lights for very little monies. So you can turn this:



Into this:



Right so we will need a few things:

Articles:
1 x Toyota Paseo (just in case you forget this part)
2 x Toyota twin filament combination Tail and Brake light (or one pair of). Recommended from a Paseo but most lamp holders from late nineties era Toyotas should work.
2 x Twin Filament Brake Lamp (P21W/5W Type)

Tools:
 - Soldering Iron
 - Wire Cutters
 - Stanley Knife (other makes are available :-P)
 - Flat-head Screwdriver (for use at a pry bar/leverage)
 - Heat source (a lighter will do if handled carefully) for the heat shrink.

Consumables:
 - Solder
 - Heat shrink
 - Wire, minimum 16 AWG, approximately 300mm/12” long
 - Self-amalgamating tape (optional)

You’ve gathered your tools, prepared a suitable work area that’s nice and dry, preferably warm and somewhere out of the wind. Well then shall we begin?
Go into the boot/trunk of the Paseo and pull back the carpet covering the rear lights, this is done to gain access to both the lamp holders and the plugs that connect them to the car’s wiring loom. You do NOT need to remove the entire rear light cluster to carry out this mod.
With the Plugs exposed it is evident that they are held captive in the bodywork of the car, this is where the screwdriver/pry bar comes in (it’s worth noting that in theory this could be done inside the car but it would be a lot more difficult/messy). Prise out both Plugs from the car body work (see items 5 and 6 in the picture below) and remove the lamp holders from the car.


The cable assembly on the right (connected to item 6, we will now call this the Reverse/Fog Assy) will be modified so that the Lamp (item 7) will no longer be a single P21W single filament type but a twin P21W/5W dual filament type.
In your warm dry working environment prepare the additional brake/side light holder, I recommend having about 150mm of wire from the unit to play with, certainly no less than 80mm. strip back 10mm or so of insulator from then end and tin the exposed conductor. Do this for each of the three ‘tails’ and identify them: (Fig.1)
- White with black stripe is the ground
- Green with White strip is the Brake (but it will be the fog on this one)
- Green is the Side (or Tail) light.
On the Reverse/Fog Assy the wire can be identified as such:
- White with black stripe is the ground
- Yellow is the Fog light
- Red is the Reverse light



Cut the ground wire 30mm from the Fog lamp holder and do the same for the Fog lamp wire. (Fig.2)



Remove the Fog lamp holder (it is no longer required for this mod) and prepare the newly cut wires for soldering. (Fig.3)



Place a suitable length of heat shrink over the Green with White stripe cable on the additional brake/side light holder and do the same for the White ground wire for later. Now you can solder the Fog lamp wire to the Brake Wire, and the Ground wire to the Ground wire (fairly obvious this far). (Fig.4)



Now you can cover and insulate the conductor with heat shrink.
Take your 300mm/12” length of wire and cut it in half (150mm/6” for the driver’s side and the other half for the passenger side), then strip back 10mm at each end and prepare exposed conductor for soldering. This is the ‘loom splicing’ wire. Solder one end to the side light (Green) wire from the additional brake/side light holder. (Fig.5)



Protect the conductor with heat shrink.
This next step was done in situ on Pedz’s car so we know there is enough wire to manipulate the holders if needs be (see aren’t we kind, we’ve done this so you don’t have to!) but you can do this off the car without worry. On the original brake/side and indicator Assy (item 5, or the left hand Plug and wiring in the earlier diagram) cut the Side (or Tail) light wire (Green) approximately 50mm from bulb holder. Strip back no more than 10mm of insulator and prepare the conductor for soldering on both ends. (Fig.6)



This bit is fiddly and you may benefit from a helping pair of hand or some Blu-Tac to hold the wires in place whilst you work. The neatest way to do this is as follows; place a good length of heat shrink over the Side light wire (Green) on the plug side of the original brake/side and indicator wiring, not the bulb holder end as you will not have enough space to stop it shrinking when you solder. This is the fiddly bit, align all the exposed Green wires (as per Fig.7) so that the plug is one side and both holder wires are the other, then solder all three together.



Then slide your good length of heat shrink over the combined solder joint and insulate the conductors. The finished loom should look something like Fig.8



Before you jump the gun and start refitting the bulb holders there is one last modification to make, otherwise the your combined fog and side light will not fit. On the additional Brake/Side light holder, locate the Locking Lug (Red Circle, see below) and cut it off, so that there are two remaining lugs opposite each other.



This will allow you to fit the new fog and side light holder into the old fog light holder.
N.B. A word of caution, by removing the Locking Lug the holder is free to rotate a full 360 degrees once fitted. This might allow the holder to fall out if fitted improperly. To prevent this always perform a 90 degree turn after refitting the holder into the light assembly, this should reduce any chance of the holder falling out.
So now all your lamps are in, you’ve check they are all illuminating correctly, go enjoy having the extra rear ward indication which subliminally says to those in the know; ‘My Paseo is here and it’s a little bit special!’



Generic Blurb bit for back-covering purposes:
Neither the author, nor the UK Paseo Club, assume any responsibility whatsoever for any work you conduct or is conducted in accordance with this guidance, or exerts pertaining to this guidance/information, as such anything you break is solely your problem (we weren’t twisting your arm now were we!)

5
Paseo Chat / Worth Saving?
« on: November 19, 2013, 01:04:18 pm »
Is any one in a position/have the temprement to save this unfortunate state of affiars. it certianly is unique...

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/toyota-paseo-project-/121200154262?pt=UK_CarParts_Acc_Wheels_tyres_Rims_Car_Wheels_ET&hash=item1c38179696#ht_82wt_1158

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